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California's New Revenge Porn Law Just Got Its First Conviction

Dagney Pruner
by Dagney Pruner Published on December 4, 2014

With all of the advancements that have been made in technology over the years, and how slow the boys up in Washington move, it is no wonder that legislation has not been able to keep up with the changing times. That means crimes which may seem black and white are not punishable by law because the laws simply do not exist yet. However, California struck a huge victory with their new revenge porn law which got its first conviction this week. Score one for the good guys.

Revenge porn is a term used to describe the distribution of pictures, video and text of sexually explicit content without the knowledge or consent of the person pictured. As nude selfies and sexting become the craze of the love struck puppies of this generation, revenge porn has become one of the most popular and biting ways to seek retribution on somebody you once cared about.

Even though that may seem clearly "wrong" in the eyes of the justice, there are only 12 states that have laws that have laws allowing the distribution of revenge porn to be punishable by law: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, Idaho, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. This means in any other state, your ex can upload and say whatever they want about you to the public without breaking any criminal laws. Similar, but weaker laws like invasion of privacy and cyberbullying are also dated and rarely result in the perpetrator serving time.

Revenge porn laws were first pushed aggressively through the legislation system after a Rutgers student videotaped and released a video of his roommate having intercourse with a male. The roommate was closeted, so after the tape spread on the Internet the roommate committed suicide. Although not directly responsible for his suicide, the student that posted the tape was found culpable for the events leading up to it and served a month in jail. The good news is states are catching on, anybody who has sent a sext or naked picture could end up being the victim of revenge porn.

California got its first conviction yesterday after finding Noe Iniguez, 36, guilty of distributing revenge porn and sentenced him to a year in jail and 36 months of probation. Iniguez posted topless pictures of his ex girlfriend on the internet with the captions "slut" and "drunk" along with other inappropriate comments. We should mention that he posted all of this on her EMPLOYER'S FACEBOOK PAGE in attempt to get her fired. Yeah, he doesn't sound bitter about the breakup at all.

Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer remarked what a victory this was for legislation catching up with the digital age: "California's new revenge porn law gives prosecutors a valuable tool to protect victims whose lives and reputations have been upended by a person they once trusted. This conviction sends a strong message that this type of malicious behavior will not be tolerated."

Although it has taken far too long, it is great to see legislators leading things in the right direction. We hope one of Joe Iniguez's friends do him a favor and change their wi fi passwords while he's in the slammer.

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Do you think revenge porn laws are moving in the right direction? Tweet at us! @wewomenUSA

This article was written by Dagney Pruner. Follow her on Twitter @dagneyp

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